amreading

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gobookyourself:

Go Book Yourself: Dan’s Top 5 Books Of 2014

Editor Daniel Dalton’s favourite reads of the year…

Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill for a witty, wise and heartbreaking book filled with profound and insightful writing.

Frances and Bernard by Carlene Bauer for an utterly gorgeous love affair written entirely in letters (released 2013, read this year).

Ablutions by Patrick DeWitt for a dark, drunken, downward spiral in a Los Angeles dive bar (released 2009, read this year).

Wolf in White Van by John Darnielle for a beautiful, haunting ballad of a novel, an ode to solitude and secret lives.

My Salinger Year Joanna Rakoff for a young woman traversing New York, publishing, her twenties, and most famous author in the world.

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Some of my favourite reads this year.

Beautiful & Necessary: Top Reads of 2013  
 I did a list for the awesome folks at Beautiful & Necessary.  Have a read !

Beautiful & Necessary: Top Reads of 2013

I did a list for the awesome folks at Beautiful & Necessary. Have a read!

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gobookyourself:

Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson

There’s only one Raoul Duke, but if you loved him, you might like these…

Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr. for the dark side of drug culture

A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick for a blackly comic tale of addiction

Crooked Little Vein by Warren Ellis for a madcap drug-fuelled US road trip

Junky by William S. Burroughs for the seminal semi-autobiographical journey into US drug culture

One of my favourite lists (that I’ve put together) so far.

Katz had read extensively in popular sociobiology, and his understanding of the depressive personality type and its seemingly perverse persistence in the human gene pool was that depression was successful adaptation to ceaseless pain and hardship. Few things gratified depressives, after all, more than really bad news. This obviously wasn’t an optimal way to live, but it had its evolutionary advantages.
— Jonathan Franzen, Freedom