When Ernest Met Francis  
 Ernest Hemingway first met F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Dingo Bar on the rue Delambre in Paris. 
 As Hemingway was sitting and drinking with some “completely worthless characters,” Fitzgerald came in with the famous baseball pitcher, Dunc Chaplin. 
 Hemingway recognised Fitzgerald, and took this chance to introduce himself; 
 
 “Mr Fitzgerald, forgive me, but my name is Ernest Hemingway, I am a writer.” 
 “Call me Scott. May I call you Ernest?” 
 “Yes.” 
 “Well, Ernest, this is my friend Dunc Chaplin, who plays baseball and went to Princeton like me.” 
 “Please to meet you…” 
 “Dunc, call me Dunc.” 
 “Dunc.” 
 
 Scott then ordered a bottle of champagne. 
 
 “To celebrate my two new friends, one of whom plays baseball better than I ever did - and I never did - and one who writes better than me, and that takes some doing.” 
 
 Fitzgerald explained how he’d read Hemingway’s work in newspapers and a couple of small magazines, and that he genuinely thought Ernest was the new voice of the 20th century. 
 So taken was Fitzgerald with Hemingway that he even told Max Perkins, his (and eventually Ernest’s) editor at Scribner’s, that Hemingway’s work would outlast his own. 
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When Ernest Met Francis

Ernest Hemingway first met F. Scott Fitzgerald in the Dingo Bar on the rue Delambre in Paris.

As Hemingway was sitting and drinking with some “completely worthless characters,” Fitzgerald came in with the famous baseball pitcher, Dunc Chaplin.

Hemingway recognised Fitzgerald, and took this chance to introduce himself;

“Mr Fitzgerald, forgive me, but my name is Ernest Hemingway, I am a writer.”

“Call me Scott. May I call you Ernest?”

“Yes.”

“Well, Ernest, this is my friend Dunc Chaplin, who plays baseball and went to Princeton like me.”

“Please to meet you…”

“Dunc, call me Dunc.”

“Dunc.”

Scott then ordered a bottle of champagne.

“To celebrate my two new friends, one of whom plays baseball better than I ever did - and I never did - and one who writes better than me, and that takes some doing.”

Fitzgerald explained how he’d read Hemingway’s work in newspapers and a couple of small magazines, and that he genuinely thought Ernest was the new voice of the 20th century.

So taken was Fitzgerald with Hemingway that he even told Max Perkins, his (and eventually Ernest’s) editor at Scribner’s, that Hemingway’s work would outlast his own.

(via)